~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Micro switches

All of our carts depend on at least one little bitty weak spring inside a microswitch to run. 
That microswitch is attached to the throttle and is the last link the sequence of events that must happen to activate the solenoid.
PDS carts only have one microswitch while Series carts, DCS carts and some other type carts also depend on the spring in microswitches on the F/R assembly to run. 

The spring that returns the wiper ("C" or Common contact) to the NC (Normally Closed) contact is an arched piece of Beryllium Copper (BeCu), but other type springs are used. 
No matter what spring arrangement is used, the return spring is the weakest mechanical part of a microswitch and typically the first to fail.
The spring is relatively weak, so a little dirt mixed with oils and/or other debris will gum it up enough to prevent it from closing the NC contacts.

The contact points are fairly small and will fail due to pitting (Arcing) and corrosion, but with proper electrical design, they'll out last the spring.
(Note: The Diode across the solenoid coil is to protect the microswitch contacts from arcing when they open - Throttle up opens the NC contacts) 

The microswitches EZGO uses on F/R and Throttle assemblies typically use the NC contacts for "GO" and mechanically opens them for "NO-GO".
That way, the cart is "NO-GO' when the little bitty weak spring fails instead of being a runaway half ton wheeled object.

The picture shows a microswitch with both NC and NO contacts, but the two terminal ones are basically same except the NO contacts aren't installed.All of our carts depend on at least one little bitty weak spring inside a microswitch to run. 
That microswitch is attached to the throttle and is the last link the sequence of events that must happen to activate the solenoid.
PDS carts only have one microswitch while Series carts, DCS carts and some other type carts also depend on the spring in microswitches on the F/R assembly to run. 

The spring that returns the wiper ("C" or Common contact) to the NC (Normally Closed) contact is an arched piece of Beryllium Copper (BeCu), but other type springs are used. 
No matter what spring arrangement is used, the return spring is the weakest mechanical part of a microswitch and typically the first to fail.
The spring is relatively weak, so a little dirt mixed with oils and/or other debris will gum it up enough to prevent it from closing the NC contacts.

The contact points are fairly small and will fail due to pitting (Arcing) and corrosion, but with proper electrical design, they'll out last the spring.
(Note: The Diode across the solenoid coil is to protect the microswitch contacts from arcing when they open - Throttle up opens the NC contacts) 

The microswitches EZGO uses on F/R and Throttle assemblies typically use the NC contacts for "GO" and mechanically opens them for "NO-GO".
That way, the cart is "NO-GO' when the little bitty weak spring fails instead of being a runaway half ton wheeled object.

The picture shows a microswitch with both NC and NO contacts, but the two terminal ones are basically same except the NO contacts aren't installed.

The Mother-load. Hard to find, gotta have, did you know, Late night reading

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~      Ezgo ID


Originally Posted by scottyb on buggies gone wild
Can you verify the year and tell us which one of the three drive systems you have? 

The last 2 numbers of the manufactures code is the year, located inside the passenger side glove box, the 2004 and newer ezgos dont have a serial number plate in the box, they have a serial number sticker under the rear access panel behind the seat, and then on the driverside frame rail below the floor board.

dcs will have a f&r lever behind the driver's knee and a run/tow switch on the enviromental cover on the controller. The backside of the f&r looks round like a hockey puck.

pds carts will have a tow/run switch with toggle switch for f&r on the dash

series carts will have a shift lever like the dcs cart down by your legs, but it will not have a tow/run switch. Also the actual f&r switch is in the corner by the controller and there is linkage from it to the lever in the center.....



Golf Cart Parts and

Golf Cart Accessories

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~      Switch direction

If the series cart runs forward in reverse ... swap the 2 cables on the F&R at the 9 and 3 oclock position. 

If the Sepex cart runs forward in reverse swap the F1 and F2 cables on the motor or controller.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~   Run Time 

​It is not possible to say what the actual drive time should be. When dealers test batteries, they use a discharge machine that takes the batteries from a full charge down to the shutdown voltage of the cart (for example, on a 36 volt system, the cart is considered in "shut down" at 32.5 volts on the pack under load). The length of time it takes do do this, coupled with the ambient temperature, gives us a rough idea of the life of the battery pack (as well as points out any bad batteries in the pack). As a general rule of thumb, any discharge time above 80 minutes is considered fair, above 90 is considered good, and above 100 is considered very good. A brand new set, properly charged and broken in should discharge at approximately 110 minutes.

The reason I gave all that information is that during "normal" operation, you are not actually running with the pedal down for 5 hours. If you were to start out and run full pedal down without let-up, the batteries should last roughly the same as a "discharge test"


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Batteries

The following data may be helpful in comparing batteries among different manufacturers. Please keep in mind that only deep cycle batteries specifically designed for golf carts should be utilized in our carts. In fact, deep cycle "marine" type batteries will usually not work satisfactorily. And most certainly, automotive "starting" batteries should never be used in a golf cart. Using an incorrect battery will most likely result in short run times and early battery failure.


6-Volt Batteries

Trojan batteries specifications:

T-105, 447 Min @25Amps, 115 Min @75Amps, 225Ah @20Amps, 62 Lbs;
T-125, 488 Min @25Amps, 132 Min @75Amps, 240Ah @20Amps, 66 Lbs;
T-145, 530 Min @25Amps, 145 Min @75Amps, 260AH @20Amps, 72 Lbs


Exide:

E3600, 390 Min @25Amps, 110 Min @75Amps to 5.25 volts, 186Ah @20Amps, 62 Lbs;
GC-5, 480 Min @25Amps, 135 Min @75Amps to 5.25 volts, 226Ah @20Amps, 65 Lbs;
GC2-H, 525 Min @25Amps, 155 Min @75Amps to 5.25 volts, 245Ah @20Amps, 68 Lbs;


NAPA 8144 (mfg. by Exide - equivilalent to Exide 3600)
390 Min @25Amps, 110 Min @75Amps, 186Ah @20 Amps, 62 Lbs

NAPA 8146 (mfg. by Exide - equivilalent to Exide GC-5)
480 Min @25Amps, 135 Min @75Amps, 226Ah @20 Amps, 65 Lbs


StowAway STGC2 (Mfg. by Exide for Sams Clubs - equivilalent to Exide E3600)
390Min @25Amps, 110 Min @75Amps, 186Ah @20Amps, 62 Lbs


US Battery:

US-1800, 392 Min @25Amps, 107 Min @75Amps, 208Ah @20Amps, 56 Lbs;
US-2000, 445 Min @25Amps, 114 Min @75Amps, 216Ah @20Amps, 59 Lbs;
US-2200, 474 Min @25Amps, 122 Min @75Amps, 232Ah @20Amps, 63 Lbs;
US-125, 517 Min @25Amps, 140 Min @75Amps, 242Ah @20Amps, 67 Lbs;
US-145, 562 Min @25Amps, 154 Min @75Amps, 251Ah @20Amps, 70 Lbs;


Deka Batteries:

GC10, (? Min @25Amps), 100 Min @75Amps, 190Ah @20Amps, 59 Lbs
GC15, (? Min @25Amps), 115 Min @75Amps, 215Ah @20Amps, 63 Lbs
GC25, 488 Min @25Amps, 132 Min @75Amps, 235Ah @20Amps, 67 Lbs


~~~~~~~~~~~~~

8-volt batteries


Trojan:

T-860, (? Min @25A), 90 Min @56A, 150Ah @20Amps, 56 lbs 
T-875, 295 Min @25A, 117 Min @56A, 170Ah @20Amps, 63 lbs 
T-890, 340 Min @25A, 132 Min @56A, 190Ah @20Amps, 69 lbs


Exide E-4800, 290 Min @25A, 110 Min @56A to 7.0 volts, 63 Lbs.


NAPA 8148 (Mfg. by Exide, similar to Exide E-4800)
290 Min @25A, 110 Min @56A, 63 Lbs. 


US Battery:

US-8VGC, 337 Min @25Amps, 128 Min @56A, 170Ah @20A, 64.5 Lbs.
US-8VGCHC, 345 Min @25Amps, 136 Min @56Amps, 183Ah @20Amps, 69 Lbs


Deka GC8V, 318 Min@25Amps, 121 Min @56Amps, 165Ah @20Amps, 67 Lbs


~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Sizes:

Trojan T-105 & T-125, L-10 3/8 W-7 1/8 H-10 7/8 
Trojan T-145, L-10 3/8 W-7 1/8 H-11 5/8 
Trojan T-875, L-10 3/8 W-7 1/8 H-10 7/8 
Trojan T-890, L-10 3/8 W-7 1/8 H-10 7/8 

Exide (all of the above listed Exide batteries)
L-10 3/8 W-7 3/16 H-11 11/32 


US Battery (all 6-volt) L-10 1/4, W-7 1/8, H-11 1/8
US Battery (all 8-volt) L-10 1/4 W-7 1/8 H-11 1/4


Deka GC15, L-10 1/4, W-7 1/8, H-11 3/8
Deka GC25, L-10 1/4 W-7 1/8 H-11 1/4
Deka GC8V, L-10 3/8 W-7 1/8 H-11 1/8 


~~~~~~~~~~~~

Misc. Info

Voltage on a fully charged battery in good condition will read 2.12 to 2.15 volts per cell (about 12.75 volts for a 12 volt battery, or 6.40 for a 6 volt)


Specific Gravity (SG) Readings to determine State of Charge (SOC)

12.75 & Above = 100% Charged
12.60 to 12.74 = 85 to 100% Charged
12.40 to 12.59 = 75 to 85% Charged
12.20 to 12.39 = 50 to 75% Charged
12.00 to 12.19 = 25 to 50% Charged
12.00 & Below = Fully Discharged


In both voltage and specific gravity readings, consistency among cells and among batteries is important. All cells SG should be within 10% of each other.



Select a category below to find the answer to your questions

​Each category is a link to a new page. When you're finished with a page close it or return here  to select a new category.


Additional information can be found in the main menu listed as:

Tech help upgrades

Solenoid technical info

Battery tech info and

Troubleshooting

Install rating system

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~      Ezgo 

What year is my EZ-GO golf cart?  ... and more

Year of Manafacture:
1976-1993 Marathon. EZGO number located on a metal plate below the passenger side glove compartment. In the EZGO Number there's a two digit year code ie:. 86 is 1986. 

1994-1995 Medalist. Metal body. EZGO number located on the metal plate inside the passenger side glove compartment. In the EZGO Number there's a two digit year code ie:. 94 is 1994

1996-Current TXT. EZGO number located on the metal plate inside the passenger side glove compartment.In the EZGO Number there's a two digit year code ie:. 96 is 1996
Electric TXT's come in Series, DCS and PDS .

In 2001 1/2 and newer EZGO changed the steering box location. Early 2001's have the Steering box mounted in the bulkhead. The later EZGO have the steering box mounted in the frint axle.



Differances in Electric TXT:

A series cart has the Forward-Reverse lever nest to your right knee.

If you have a switch on the the dash you have a DCS or PDS cart.


E-Z-GO's "PREMIUM" Drive Systems

DCS= Drive Control System - Mid 1994 to late 90's
PDS= Precision Drive System - Late 90's to Present

The Series speed control has remained unchanged since 1994.
Both DCS and PDS include a feature to stop unattended run-away cars.

The PDS car also has a governor feature that will hold a constant
ground speed at full pedal, regardless of terrain.

The DCS or PDS car will have a toggle switch under the seat marked "Run" & "Tow/Maintenance"
If no switch on the black controller cover, the car has the SERIES system.

Chips and what they do.

Performance Option Top Speed (mph) Engine Braking 
All Terrain 13-13.5 NO Chip
Steep Hill 13-13.5 heavy Blue Chip
Mild Hill 14-14.5 mild Yellow Chip
Freedom 17-19 none Red Chip

Trouble Shooting and Testing of Electric EZGO


ELECTRONIC SPEED CONTROL - NON DCS
ALWAYS DISCONNECT NEGATIVE BATTERY CABLE BEFORE REMOVING CONTROLLER COVER.
RE-CONNECT CABLE AFTER COVER IS REMOVED.

These test are to be conducted after making sure all wires and connections are secure.

JACK UP REAR WHEELS

Connect (-) probe of meter on BL- battery post. (This probe will REMAIN on the post for the rest of the testing procedures)
Connect (+) probe to the BL+ battery post. (This reading is the Battery Voltage)

POWER TO THE CONTROLLER - Key switch ON, FORWARD Direction

Place the (+) probe on the battery side of the solenoid's large post (If the reading is below battery voltage, check all wiring and terminals).
Place the (+) probe to the controller side of the solenoid's large post. The reading should be 0.1 to 3 volts less than battery voltage.
If the reading is more than 3 volts less the battery voltage, the resistor is faulty.
If the voltage is the same as the battery voltage, replace the solenoid.

INDUCTIVE THROTTLE SENSOR key switch ON - Forward direction - Accel. pedal pushed JUST to solenoid activation.

Install a "jumper wire" between the batteries BL+ post and the solenoid post with red wires attached.

AT THE SIX PIN CONNECTOR OF THE CONTROLLER

Place the (+) probe on the red wire terminal of the connector.
If battery voltage isNOT present, the red wire between the solenoid and the six pin connector is faulty.
Place the (+) probe on the black wire terminal of the connector.
The reading should be slightly above 14 volts but LESS than 15 volts. If the voltage is not correct, the Throttle Sensor MAY be faulty.
Separate the (4) four pin connector between the pedal box and the controller that's located on the passenger's side of the battery compartment. If the voltage goes to 14 volts, the sensor is faulty. If the voltage remains below 14 volts, the controller is faulty.

RECONNECT the (4) four pin connector.

Place the (+) probe on the white wire terminal of the six pin connector. Depress the pedal slowly.
The reading should be 0.45 - 0.53 volts just as the microswitch is activated.
Depress the pedal slowly to full throttle. To ready should move smoothly to about 1.5 volts.
If the reading is incorrect, The Throttle Sensor is defective.

REMOVE THE JUMPER WIRE AND (-) PROBE

CHECKING CONTROLLER OUTPUT

Connect (-) probe to M- terminal.
Connect (+) probe to B+ terminal.
Reading should indicate approx. 0 volts.
Slowly depress accel. pedal. The reading should show the voltage increasing to battery voltage when fully depressed.
If the voltage is at or near battery voltage and the motor is not turning, problem lies in either the forward/reverse switch, wiring or the motor.
If the voltage increases by a few volts and then stops changing while the pedal is being depressed, remove the orange wire at the "Reverse Micro switch".
If the voltage is not at or near battery voltage, replace the controller.
If battery voltage is present, the problem lies in the reverse circuit.

Re-connect the orange wire.


ELECTRONIC SPEED CONTROL - DCS
ALWAYS DISCONNECT NEGATIVE BATTERY CABLE BEFORE REMOVING CONTROLLER COVER.
RE-CONNECT CABLE AFTER COVER IS REMOVED.

These test are to be conducted after making sure all wires and connections are secure.

JACK UP REAR WHEELS

Connect (-) probe of meter on BL- battery post.
Connect (+) probe to the BL+ battery post. (This reading is the Battery Voltage)
Connect (+) probe to the battery side of the solenoid's large stud. The same voltage should be present. If not, inspect all solenoid and battery cables.

DISCONNECT battery bl(+) wire and UNPLUG the "Run,Tow/Maintenance switch.
Perform a continuity test on wires:
1 and 2
3 and 4

POWER TO THE CONTROLLER

Turn the key switch ON and place in FORWARD
Connect (-) probe of meter to BL- battery post.(This probe will REMAIN on the post for the rest of the testing procedures)
Place the (+) probe on the battery side of the solenoid's large post (If the reading is below battery voltage, check all wiring and terminals).
Place the (+) probe to the controller side of the solenoid's large post. The reading should be 0.1 to 3 volts less than battery voltage.
If the reading is more than 3 volts less the battery voltage, the resistor is faulty.
If the voltage is the same as the battery voltage, replace the solenoid.

INDUCTIVE THROTTLE SENSOR key switch ON - Forward direction - Accel. pedal pushed JUST to solenoid activation.

AT THE TEN PIN CONNECTOR OF THE CONTROLLER

Place the (+) probe on the red wire terminal of the connector.
If battery voltage is NOT present, the red wire between the Run-Tow/Maintenance Switch and the Ten Pin Connector is faulty.
Place the (+) probe on the black wire terminal of the connector.
The reading should be slightly above 14 volts but LESS than 16 volts. If the voltage is below 14 volts, the Throttle Sensor MAY be faulty. Above 16 volts, the controller MAY be faulty
Separate the (6) six pin connector (only 4 are used) between the pedal box and the controller. If the voltage goes to 14-16 volts, the sensor is faulty. If the voltage remains below 14 or above 16 volts, the controller is faulty.

RECONNECT the (6) six pin connector.

Place the (+) probe on the white wire terminal of the six pin connector. Depress the pedal slowly.
The reading should be 0.45 - 0.53 volts just as the microswitch is activated.
Depress the pedal slowly to full throttle. To ready should move smoothly to about 1.5 volts.
If the reading is incorrect, The Throttle Sensor is defective.

Electric Motor test

If the motor fails to turn the following tests can assist in troubleshooting.
Disconnect all wires to the motor and label them

Make sure none of the terminals are grounded to the motor (F1 terminal to motor frame) and continuity is present between F1 & F2 and A1 and A2 but not between them (A1 to F1).
If any of these test fail, the motor would not operate correctly even if the required 36/48 volts to the motor were applied.


1) Connect POSITIVE wire (36/48 volts) to A-1 terminal.
2) Connect NEGATIVE wire (36/48 volts) to F-1 terminal.
3) Use a jumper wire to connect A-2 and F-2 terminals.
Motor should turn.




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~  Ground wire

Never ground any connection to the electric cart frame . The battery pack contains several megajoules of energy, more than enough to create an arc many times brighter than the sun.
Hydrogen gas is produced during the charge/discharge cycle and all that is needed is a spark to go boom!
The electrolyte is 35% h2so4 and there are gallons of it waiting to be launched.

If b- is attached to the frame, any metal to metal contact between any of the high current carrying cable connectors and the frame could:
A. Weld the short circuit in place
b. Explode one or more batteries
c. Spray gallons of sulphuric acid all over everything in the vicinity.

While isolating the frame doesn't eliminate all the safety hazards lurking under the seat, it does mitigate some of the avoidable ones.

When working under the seat, always wear safety goggles, full face shield is preferred.
Avoid using wrenches long enough to short between battery posts if dropped. (torque spec for battery terminals is only 100 in/lb, so you don't need much leverage) 
ezgo and other cart manufactures advocate using insulated wrenches. (personally, i believe insulated tools tend to create a false sense of security)
the batteries themselves are the source of the hazards and they cannot be turned off.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~   More to Come


The Cart SHUDDERS when I try to go. Why is this happening. 

Answer: The most common cause is low battery pack voltage under load.

A less common cause is a bad cable connection.

Solution: New batteries and or cables

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~      Battery care and more ...

​BATTERY CARE
New batteries should be given a full charge before use.

New batteries need to be cycled several times before reaching full capacity (50 - 125 cycles, depending on type). Usage should be limited during this period.

Battery cables should be intact, and the connectors kept tight at all times. Systematic inspection is recommended.

Vent caps should be kept in place and tight during vehicle operation and battery charging.

Batteries should be kept clean and free of dirt and corrosion at all times.

Batteries should be watered after charging unless plates are exposed before charging. If exposed add just enough water to cover plate tops by 1/8". Check acid level after charge. The acid level should be kept 1/4" below the bottom of the fill well in the cell cover.

Water used to replenish batteries should be distilled or treated not to exceed 200 T.D.S. (total dissolved solids...parts per million). Particular care should be taken to avoid metallic contamination (iron).

For best battery life, batteries should not be discharged below 80% of their rated capacity. Proper battery sizing will help avoid excessive discharge.

Battery chargers should be matched to fully charge batteries in an eight hour period. Defective chargers will damage batteries or severely reduce their performance.

Avoid charging at temperatures above 120°F or ambient, whichever is higher.

Deep cycle batteries need to be equalized periodically. Equalizing is an extended, low current charge performed after the normal charge cycle. This extra charge helps keep all cells in balance. Actively used batteries should be equalized once per week. Manually timed charges should have the charge time extended approximately 3 hours. Automatically controlled chargers should be unplugged and reconnected after completing a charge.

In situations where multiple batteries are connected in series, parallel or series/parallel, replacement battery(s) should be of the same size, age and usage level as the companion batteries. Do not put a new battery in a pack which has 50 or more cycles. Either replace with all new or use a good used battery(s).

Periodic battery testing is an important preventative maintenance procedure. Hydrometer readings of each cell (fully charged) gives an indication of balance and true charge level. Imbalance could mean the need for equalizing; is often a sign of improper charging or a bad cell. Voltage checks (open circuit, charged and discharged) can locate a bad battery or weak battery. Load testing will pick out a bad battery when other methods fail. A weak battery will cause premature failure of companion batteries.

Always use a matched voltage charger and battery pack system. An undersized charger will never get the job done, no matter how long you let it run. An oversized charger will cause excess gassing and heat; this situation could cause explosions or other damage.

As batteries age, their maintenance requirements change. This means longer charging time and/or higher finish rate (higher amperage at the end of the charge). Usually older batteries need to be watered more often. And, their capacity decreases. 

Lead acid batteries should be brought up to full charge at the earliest opportunity. Avoid continuously operating batteries in a partially charged condition. This will shorten their life and reduce their capacity.

Extreme temperatures can substantially affect battery performance and charging. Cold reduces battery capacity and retards charging. Heat increases water usage and can result in overcharging. Very high temperatures can cause " thermal run-away" which may lead to an explosion or fire. If extreme temperature is an unavoidable part of an application, consult a battery/charger specialist about ways to deal with the problem.

Inactivity can be extremely harmful to all lead acid batteries. If seasonal use is anticipated, we recommend the following:
a. Completely charge the battery before storing. 
b. Remove all electrical connections from the battery, including series/parallel connectors. 
c. Store the battery in as cool a place as possible. However, do not store in a location which will 
consistently be below 32°F. Batteries will discharge when stored, the lower the temperature the 
lower the self discharge. 
d. When not in use, boost every two months. 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:
Q: How to charge deep cycle batteries.

A: There are numerous correct ways to charge the batteries. Typically, charge at C÷10 amperes, (where C = the 20 hour capacity of the system expressed in Ampere Hours) until the battery voltage rises to 2.583 Volts per cell (i.e. 7.75 volts for a 6V battery). Hold this voltage constant for 2 to 4 hours, and stop charging. A similar method would be to charge at the following upper limits and terminate the charge when the time limit is reached:
* Charge Current = C÷10 Amperes
* Charge Voltage = 2.583 Volts per Cell
* Charge Time = 10 Hours Battery temperature adjustment: reduce the voltage by 0.028 Volts per Cell for every 10°F above 80°F, increase by the same amount for temperatures below 80°F.

Q: What is the float voltage for standby applications?

A: 2.17 Volts per Cell adjustment for the temperature as above.


Q: What size battery do I need for my application?

A: Determine how many amperes your application needs from the battery and for how long. Multiply the two to obtain Ampere Hours required. Increase this by 20% for a safety cushion, and from our capacity charts, match a battery which will deliver this many AH for the required time, and voltage. Connecting batteries in parallel adds AH, and connecting in series adds the voltage. In either case the energy (WH) storage capability is increased by the amount of energy each additional battery provides.

Q: What is the cycle life of your batteries? 
A: Any claims of lasting longer are based on selective data, as a marketing gimmick (i.e. selecting the best of one and worst of the other) and is misleading. Battery life, like anything else, cannot be precisely pre-determined, any more than the life of your car or humans. The actual life out in the field, when operated under identical conditions, 
is the only valid criteria



~~~~~~~~~~~~~   EZGO ID PLATE


in 2003 E-Z-GO stopped putting an ID plate inside the passenger side glove box. After 2003 the SN and Mfg Code can be found on a small white label attached to the frame just under the black plastic access panel, immediately behind the middle of the bench seat. In 2004 they started stamping the SN into the frame in this same location but the little white label still has the Mfg Code & the SN.
The last 2 numbers in the manufacturing code is the year of the cart.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~     8v battery info 

8 Volt Golf Cart Battery: The Top Six
Should you go with the 8 volt golf cart battery, or put some other type in your electric car? Here's a comparison of the most popular ones, a warning, and a word or two of advice from an expert.

Advantages of the 8 volt golf cart battery for your EV
Less initial cost. If you're operating on a shoestring, this might make the difference between getting your electric car on the road and leaving it, nearly complete, littering up the garage. 
Lighter weight. Typical car-load of 8-volt golf cart batteries will weigh 1000-1200 pounds, rather than 1200-1600 pounds if you use the same overall voltage of 6-volt batteries. For example: Powering a 120 volt system means using 20 six volt batteries, or 15 eight volt batteries. Fifteen 8v batteries weigh less than 20 6v golf cart batteries, overall. If you're pushing your weight limit already, this may be a consideration. 
DISadvantages of the 8 volt golf cart battery for your EV
Shorter life. Amp hours are heavy, and deep-cyclable electrode plates are heavy; since the amp hours in these 8 volt batteries are reasonably comparable to their 6 volt counterparts (although see next item on the list!), this can only mean that the electrode plates are somewhat less sturdy...which means you can't charge and discharge them as many times as their six volt cousins before they refuse to recharge again. This is the cycle life of a battery, and in general, the cycle life of an 8 volt golf cart battery is shorter than that of a 6 volt golf cart battery. 
Range is shorter. Lead is fuel, and it's heavy. Less weight means less lead...and less lead means less miles. Additionally, and for reasons only the physics-minded among us can fully appreciate (that's not me!), the 8 volt batteries can be drained faster by a lead FOOT than the 6 volt variety, leaving you with fewer miles than you might like. 
Are you wondering about 12 volt batteries, then, why they weren't mentioned in this discussion? It's because the "Lead Foot Factor" I just mentioned becomes a REAL issue with 12 volt batteries. These are usually reserved for either AC drive systems, which use batteries more conservatively, or EV racers who are simply looking to pour as many amps into their electric motors for the quarter-mile as quickly as possible. They don't care if the range is stunted by the drivers lead foot, just as long as they win; )

Most popular 8 volt golf cart batteries used in electric cars
Two major brands of 8 volt golf cart battery dominate with respect to EV popularity: Trojan, with their most popular T-875, the leader by far, and their T-860 (less AH) and T-890 (more AH); and US Battery with their 8VGC family.

Trojan T-875 8 volt golf cart battery These don't come in the preferred L-terminal type, so be aware of this before you decide on an 8-volt battery format.

Rate of Discharge: 295 min. @ 25 amps -- ? @ 75 amps 
Amp-Hours (AH): 145 AH @ 5 hr. rate, 170 @ 20 hr. rate 
Weight: 63 lbs. 
Dimensions: 10 3/8 in. x 7 1/8 in. x 10 7/8 in. 
Cycle Life: 650 cycles 



The Trojan website isn't too forthcoming with cycle life information for these (I got "650 cycles" from a discussion on the EVDL), nor rate of discharge at 75 amps (which is the rate that matters more to EV drivers).

Trojan T-860 8 volt golf cart battery

Rate of Discharge: No info 
Amp-Hours (AH): 125 AH @ 5 hr. rate, 150 AH @ 20 hr. rate 
Weight: 56 lbs. 
Dimensions: 10 3/8 in. x 7 1/8 in. x 10 7/8 in. 
Cycle Life: 650 cycles 





~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~     That Club Car orange light (battery light)

That orange light is suggesting that your batteries are getting low when you are running your cart even if they aren't. Mine starts to flash around 48.4 volts or 50% of pack once settled. It still sounds like your OBC isn't reading things right so I'd try and reset it based on the stickies at the top of the thread once again. They can go bad as well but if you have a good battery pack showing 50.93+ when fully charged and it can last you a long time it must be the way the OBC is seeing things.

Resetting the OBC, (taken from AllTrax)
To reset the OBC the following must be done in this
order:

Key Switch to Off

Forward/Reverse to Neutral

Tow/Run Switch to Tow

Disconnect the Battery NEGATIVE (–) wire
from the Battery Minus terminal on the battery
pack.

Put the Tow/Run to Run

Forward/Reverse Switch to Reverse

Key Switch to On

Lock the throttle pedal down
The reverse buzzer will sound and go off in about 30
seconds. Leave the cart like that for 5 min to cause the
OBC to reset.
To reconnect the OBC back into the system:

Key Switch to Off

Forward/Reverse Switch to Neutral

Tow/Run switch to Tow

Reconnect the Batt – wire to the battery minus
terminal on the battery pack.
Once the OBC has been reset, the cart can be
troubleshot. There is always a chance the OBC has
completely failed and the reset process will not fix the
problem.



Frequently Asked Questions 

​                    FAQ

Answers to the most commonly   asked Golf Cart questions.

       The Mother Load !

The shudder. What is it exactly? What happens mechanically when the cart shudders instead of doing what you told it to do?

The solenoid is rapidly engaging and disengaging causing the power supply to be turned on/off & on/off rapidly and repeatedly. Why?

Battery voltage is highest when at rest and lowest when under load. At rest the battery voltage is high enough to activate the solenoid coil and the cart begins to go but the pack cannot sustain the power needed run the cart and the pack voltage is significantly reduced by the load. This reduced voltage is not high enough to keep the solenoid closed so it opens, stopping the cart. 

BUT WAIT> as soon as the solenoid is opened the load is removed from the pack & the voltage rises and the solenoid re-engages only to pull the pack down to where it has to drop out again. And this continues to happen over and over at a very high rate of speed. You feel the cart shudder..... the solenoid is being hammered. Contact wear & damage is occurring at a accelerated pace when this happens.


golf ​​​​​​​Carts Unlimited

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Cart Weight


The information below is the dry weight without batteries or modifications direct from the manufacturer. Most often electric golf carts weigh less than gasoline golf carts until you put batteries in them. Six 60 pound batteries (average)360 #s)   nearly double the electric cart weight.


Club Car Precedent Electric: 495 Pounds
Club Car Precedent Gas: 606 Pounds
Club Car DS IQ-System Electric: 498 Pounds
Club Car DS Gas: 619 Pounds

EZGO RXV Electric: 571 Pounds
EZGO RXV Gas: 697 Pounds
EZGO Medalist/TXT Electric: 550 Pounds
EZGO Medalist/TXT Gas: 750 Pounds
EZGO Marathon Electric: N/A
EZGO Marathon Gas: N/A

Yamaha The Drive Electric: 535 Pounds
Yamaha The Drive Gas: 536 Pounds
Yamaha G22 Electric: 549 Pounds
Yamaha G22 Gas: 670 Pounds
Yamaha G19 Electric: 560 Pounds
Yamaha G19 Gas: N/A
Yamaha G16 Electric: 560 Pounds
Yamaha G16 Gas: 653 Pounds
Yamaha G14 Electric: 560 Pounds
Yamaha G14 Gas: 661 Pounds
Yamaha G9 Electric: 519 Pounds
Yamaha G9 Gas: 606 Pounds
Yamaha G8 Electric: 556 Pounds
Yamaha G8 Gas: 672 Pounds
Yamaha G5 Sun Classic: 798 Pounds
Yamaha G2 Electric: N/A
Yamaha G2 Gas: 606 Pounds
Yamaha G1 Gas: 684 Pounds


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~      Motor Check 

​SEPEX motor check 


Turn off, remove key, jack up car so rear wheels are off ground.
Remove all cabling from motor. Mark where each cable was connected to motor.
With a jumper connect A1 to F1
With a jumper connect A2 to F2
Supply power to the A terminals.(6-12 volts should be fine)
Use at your own risk. A small spark is expected each time you make/break the connection. Dont forget to jack the cart up and get the rear wheels off the ground. Make sure the brake is off.



Series motor check 


Turn off, remove key, jack up car so rear wheels are off ground.
Remove all cabling from motor. Mark where each cable was connected to motor.
With a jumper connect S1 to A2.
Supply power to the A1 and S2 terminals.(6-12 volts should be fine)
Use at your own risk. A small spark is expected each time you make/break the connection. Dont forget to jack the cart up and get the rear wheels off the ground. Make sure the brake is off.



Solenoid Check 


Disconnect both large and small wires from solenoid
Supply pack voltage to the small terminals. Should click
With a volt/ohm meter check the large terminals for continuity. Just because it clicks doesn't mean its good


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~      NEW BATTERY BREAK-IN PROCEDURE:
Following proper break-in procedure can increase the strength and the useful life span of your new batteries. New batteries are initially about 75% of their full strength. The following procedure will insure they reach their full potential.
The 1st 10 to 20 complete charge/discharge cycles are critical to insure they reach 100%. New batteries should be charged before use and thereafter as follows:
Plug the charger in and leave it alone until charger shuts off by itself. Then drive to discharge the batteries to 75% battery pack capacity (see chart) Plug the cart back in and repeat the charge cycle.......It is very important you let it charge until it is completely done. Repeat this for the first 10 - 20 cycles......by the 12th cycle you will notice a difference in power, speed, and run-time.........I have never had a customer say they have not noticed the increase.
Most importantly, NEVER run the battery pack down below 50% of capacity throughout their entire life. Never leave the batteries in a state of discharge for extended periods of time. Recharge the pack once a week if the cart is sitting idle or in storage. And when in doubt, recharge it.
During the break-in procedure, keep an eye on the water levels. T can take 12 hours or more for the 1st few Charging times. These extended charge cycles may evaporate some of the water. ( use distilled water only ) 
As the batteries break in you will notice the charge time gets shorter. Eventually going from 12 to 5-6 hours per recharge.
ONCE A MONTH:
Routine maintenance is the 2nd most important thing to insure you get the most use out of your new battery pack. It is critical that you get into a routine of spending 10 - 15 minutes a month to keep the cable connections clean and check the water levels. Proper water level is critical. Dry batteries die quickly.
Keep the Distilled Water level up to the bottom of the fill hole sleeve or a half inch above the lead plates. Do not fill to the top.
Use a hard nylon brush to remove any visible corrosion. Carefully check that all of the cable connections are tight. Loose connections cause arching which will melt the soft lead terminals. Spray-on Battery Terminal Protector is available from the auto parts store and greatly reduces corrosive build up. 
I hope this helps you get the most use possible out of your battery investment.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~   Wheel offsets


The position of the mounting flange determines whether the wheel is a negative offset or a center mount wheel. The mounting flage is the inner part of the wheel where the holes for the lug nuts are located.

Center mount wheels means that the mounting flange is located right in the middle of the wheel so there is about an equal distance to either side of the wheel from where you bolt the wheel to the cart. Most golf carts are originally manufactured with center mounted wheels.

Negative off set wheels means that the mounting flange of the wheel is closer to the body of the golf cart. When the mounting flage is closer to the body of the cart, it essentially lets the rest of the wheel hang further out, meaning that the tire will be further away from the golf cart body.

With custom and lifted golf carts, this helps to prevent the tires from rubbing against the fender walls or suspension and steering mechanisms of the cart. Negative off set wheels are best for off-roading or golf carts with lift kits -- carts that generally use bigger or wider tires